During this era a focus on exercise, non-use of tobacco, and the elimination of coffee, tea, sugar, meat and spice from a diet, called "Grahamism," – named after reformer Sylvester Graham – was promoted. Eugenic or "hereditarian" concerns that masturbation would lead to insanity and that choosing sick or feeble spouses would lead to further degeneration was discussed. Out of this era Phrenology – the study of shapes and bumps on the head – used to select a healthy marriage partner was popular. New religions that promoted "pure" lifestyles such as The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and Seventh-day Adventists emerged.
Supplements can't substitute for a healthy diet, which supplies other potentially beneficial compounds besides vitamins and minerals. Foods also provide the synergy that many nutrients require to be efficiently used in the body. Still, for many people a basic multivitamin/mineral pill can provide some of the nutrients they may fall short on. Certain people may also need supplements of folic acid, vitamin B12, calcium, and vitamin D (see next slide).
Developing healthy eating habits isn’t as confusing or as restrictive as many people imagine. The essential steps are to eat mostly foods derived from plants—vegetables, fruits, whole grains, legumes (such as beans and lentils), and nuts—and limit highly processed foods. If you eat animal foods, you can add in some dairy products, fish, poultry, and lean meat. Studies show that people who eat this way have a reduced risk of heart disease, diabetes, and possibly cancer and other chronic diseases. Here are our guidelines for building a healthy diet.

This little book is the perfect introduction and reference in clean eating. Sierra touches on the thoughts and science of clean eating, the sanity of living a cleaner lifestyle. I especially appreciated the food list and the pages on mindfulness and meditation. I do believe they are the best tools to eating clean. If you are looking for a wonderful, non-judgemental first guide to the CECL movement, this is a first step.
Your tip When you detox, you define eating as unhealthy and starvation as virtuous. Instead of depriving yourself as a ritual, focus on each bite and appreciate its health benefits. "I've started keeping nuts and fruit near me when I work, and I'm taking breaks to sit down and eat," Kai says. "Not only do I like eating more, but [I'm] also getting some quiet time."
Fresh, Frozen, or Canned Fruits ― don’t think just apples or bananas. All fresh, frozen, or canned fruits are great choices. Be sure to try some “exotic” fruits, too. How about a mango? Or a juicy pineapple or kiwi fruit! When your favorite fresh fruits aren’t in season, try a frozen, canned, or dried variety of a fresh fruit you enjoy. One caution about canned fruits is that they may contain added sugars or syrups. Be sure and choose canned varieties of fruit packed in water or in their own juice.
According to Foroutan, she believes there are many different ways to think of detoxification in terms of MNT. “There is the general advice for supporting detoxification pathways that can and should be done year-round, such as eating more cruciferous vegetables and high-antioxidant foods, choosing organic foods [to minimize pesticides and other toxins], drinking green tea and more water, establishing optimal bowel habits, working up a sweat regularly, and reducing contact with external toxins,” she says, adding that she believes this advice could benefit many clients.
Sheila Dean, DSc, RD, LD, CCN, CDE, an integrative medicine nutritionist and adjunct professor at the USF Health Morsani College of Medicine, agrees: “The words ‘toxin’ and ‘detox’ mean different things to different people. It means different things to the layperson and even among the scientific community, even within the field of dietetics. I don’t believe that there’s consensus and, in my opinion, it’s more about a lack of understanding than a lack of scientific research.”
Another way to be a good role model is to serve appropriate portions and not overeat. Talk about your feelings of fullness, especially with younger children. You might say, "This is delicious, but I'm full, so I'm going to stop eating." Similarly, parents who are always dieting or complaining about their bodies may foster these same negative feelings in their kids. Try to keep a positive approach about food.
Cruciferous veggies such as broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, and Brussels sprouts contain sulfur-containing phytochemicals called glucosinolates, which are protective against cancer, anti-inflammatory, and may help the body remove toxins. One study found that a drink made with broccoli activated enzymes that helped pick up pollutants from the bloodstream and flush them out via urine. Cruciferous veggies are also high in fiber, which helps feed "good" probiotic gut bacteria and promote digestion. That’s critical, since a damaged (or leaky) gut allows various toxins and bacteria into the bloodstream, contributing to issues like systemic inflammation and autoimmune disease.
In the history of the United States, a clean living movement is a period of time when a surge of health-reform crusades, many with moral overtones, erupts into the popular consciousness. This results in individual, or group reformers such as the anti-tobacco or alcohol coalitions of the late twentieth century, to campaign to eliminate the health problem or to "clean up" society. The term "Clean Living Movement" was coined by Ruth C. Engs, a Professor of Applied Health Sciences at Indiana University in 1990.
Healthy eating should be about positive choices, focusing on foods that provide the nutrients you need to maintain good health. Unfortunately, much of the dietary advice available today focuses on what you “cannot” or “should not” eat. Our nutrition education resources and healthy eating articles will help you determine what you can do to make healthy eating decisions.
Healthy eating should be about positive choices, focusing on foods that provide the nutrients you need to maintain good health. Unfortunately, much of the dietary advice available today focuses on what you “cannot” or “should not” eat. Our nutrition education resources and healthy eating articles will help you determine what you can do to make healthy eating decisions.

Common food intolerances include those to soy, gluten, corn, eggs, peanuts, shellfish, and dairy. If you have some of the symptoms above, consider eliminating potential trigger foods for a period of time (it usually takes a few weeks to notice a difference), preferably under the supervision of a doctor or registered dietitian. You’ll also want to eliminate alcohol since your body registers alcohol as a toxin and relies on your liver to process and eliminate it, which can put stress on the organ.
Dinner? That's miso soup with some chopped sea vegetables (like the Japanese nori, used to make sushi) snipped over top. Or you might choose a cup of brown rice with a few chopped vegetables mixed in. "Brown rice gives your body plenty of B vitamins, which is a stress reducer. It's very high fiber, will fill you up, will help you sleep, and will flush you out in the morning."
“One of the best ways to reboot your diet is to rethink your fruits and vegetables. Both fruits and vegetables provide fiber, vitamins, minerals and phytonutrients (natural plant chemicals that help fight and prevent disease),” Toby Amidor, MS, RD, author of "Smart Meal Prep for Beginners," says. Most Americans aren’t anywhere close to meeting their needs. (90 percent fall short of vegetable recommendations and 85 percent aren’t meeting their fruit quota.) To help you boost your intake and your overall health, Amidor offers these suggestions: “Add sliced strawberries to your oatmeal at breakfast, opt for a vegetable salad topped with lean protein at lunch, and fill half your dinner plate with a steamed vegetable medley. And don’t forget snacks! Enjoy sliced carrots, celery and jicama with hummus or top your Greek yogurt with sliced strawberries.”
The Progressive era's health reform movement emerged in the third great awakening. Individual health crusades, as part of an overall Clean Living Movement, included the temperance and the anti-saloon movement which evolved into the prohibition movement. This resulted in the Eighteenth Amendment, or prohibition. An anti-tobacco movement was found during this era and a number of cities had anti-smoking laws in public buildings. Trains, restaurants, and streetcars often had smoking and non smoking sections. However, these laws by the mid twentieth-century were generally ignored.

These include soda, candy, white bread, regular pasta, and many snack foods and baked goods. A high intake of added sugar increases inflammation and insulin resistance, increasing the risk of diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and other disorders—and it supplies “empty” calories that contribute to weight gain. Refined grain products have little dietary fiber and have been stripped of many nutrients; a high intake can cause many of the same health problems as added sugar.


As part of our Clean Living investment theme, we’ve seen case volumes of not only sugary beverages but also those laced with artificial sweeteners come under pressure as consumers shift to healthier alternatives, including a variety of waters both still and sparkling. Existing soda giants, such as Coca-Cola have been expanding their beverage offering in […]
Sometimes the "toxins" that are making it more difficult for our bodies to function optimally are foods that we’re intolerant or allergic to, but we don’t know it yet. Allergies are more obvious and often involve swelling and trouble breathing. But intolerances and their symptoms are subtler and can trigger an inflammatory response in the gut that leads to full-body inflammation and symptoms such as diarrhea, constipation, bloating, eczema, joint aches, and migraines.

When it comes to clean eating in America, it's extremely difficult. Everywhere you turn you are exposed to foods with high fat, high carbs, msg, and processed foods. It's truly a challenge but it's not impossible. This book was very practical with its instructions on how to go about trying to eat clean. Very understandable instructions and very easy to follow. Also, I love the different delicious recipes it highlights. I highly recommend this to anyone that is attempting to have a cleaner diet.
Your tip When you detox, you define eating as unhealthy and starvation as virtuous. Instead of depriving yourself as a ritual, focus on each bite and appreciate its health benefits. "I've started keeping nuts and fruit near me when I work, and I'm taking breaks to sit down and eat," Kai says. "Not only do I like eating more, but [I'm] also getting some quiet time."
Sheila Dean, DSc, RD, LD, CCN, CDE, an integrative medicine nutritionist and adjunct professor at the USF Health Morsani College of Medicine, agrees: “The words ‘toxin’ and ‘detox’ mean different things to different people. It means different things to the layperson and even among the scientific community, even within the field of dietetics. I don’t believe that there’s consensus and, in my opinion, it’s more about a lack of understanding than a lack of scientific research.”
Make half your plate fruits and vegetables: Choose red, orange, and dark-green vegetables like tomatoes, sweet potatoes, and broccoli, along with other vegetables for your meals. Add fruit to meals as part of main or side dishes or as dessert. The more colorful you make your plate, the more likely you are to get the vitamins, minerals, and fiber your body needs to be healthy.
Juice diets do prevent your body from going into a state called ketosis, he says. Ketosis means your body has no carbohydrates to burn for energy, so it has to burn stored fat or whatever else is available, he tells WebMD. "You feel bad, even smell bad. That's what makes you feel like hell during a [water-only] fast. But is that because the toxins are coming out? No! You're going into ketosis. It's known physiology."
Eat like a tourist in Greece. The sunset over your office park isn't as stunning as the one over an Aegean beach, but a plate of grilled fish and fresh vegetables and a glass of wine is as delicious in Athens, Georgia, as it is in Athens, Greece. All the heart-healthy fats, minerals, and antioxidants in Mediterranean foods like hummus, olive oil, and feta can help lower your risk for heart disease, says Susan Mitchell, Ph.D., coauthor of Fat Is Not Your Fate (Fireside).
According to data published by the NPD Group: Three out of five Americans say they want more protein in their diets; Fourteen percent of U.S. consumers, or more than 43 million people, regularly use plant-based products and 86 percent of them aren’t vegans or vegetarian. These figures are in sync with the growing influence of our Clean Living investing […]
When it comes down to it, clean living is a lifestyle focused on leading a healthy and natural life – and a healthy life is the first step toward a happy life. Skip the bad and risky stuff, and stick to the stuff you know is good. Avoid chemicals and artificial or synthetic things, and go for what’s real. Your body is your home, so take care of it! It’s the only one you get.
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