“Detox diets range from total starvation fasts to juice fasts to food modification approaches and often involve the use of laxatives, diuretics, vitamins, minerals and/or ‘cleansing foods,’” writes Hosen Kiat, Head of Cardiology at Macquarie University Hospital and the Australian School of Advanced Medicine, and Dr. Alice Klein from the Cardiac Health Institute, in a review about detoxification diets published in the Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics.
Brooke Alpert, MS, RD, CDN, is a nationally recognized nutrition expert and author. She is the founder of B Nutritious, www.b-nutritious.com, a private nutrition counseling and consulting practice in New York City. Brooke’s expertise and nutrition knowledge has lead her to be featured on national television regularly including, The Doctor Oz Show, The Today Show, Access Hollywood and more. She was named one of the new up and coming stars in the beauty and health field in W Magazine and has been quoted and featured extensively in both national and international magazines including People, Shape, Glamour, Town & Country, Tatler and more.
From reducing salt and fats from its snack business to the introduction of Bulby, its own line of flavored seltzer waters, PepsiCo continues to transform its business in line with shifting consumer preferences that are reflected in our Clean Living investing theme. With the acquisition of SodaStream, Pepsico takes several steps forward as it not only […]
"The term 'detox' has become a buzzword that is often misused by the media and consumers," says Jackie Armstrong, MPH, RDN, EP-C. Jackie is a Performance & Wellness Nutritionist at Stanford University and the founder of Well-Fueled.com. She says that detox diets are often misunderstood. "Our organs and tissues are constantly in a state of detoxification — getting rid of unwanted substances produced by the body or from our environment." She goes on to explain that research is lacking to support the effectiveness of most detox diets.
This shift in preference for healthy, natural products and the eschewing of artificial chemicals, sweeteners, sugar and other synthetics in all aspects of our lives is one of the basic building blocks for Tematica Research’s Clean Living investing theme. The Clean Living movement isn’t restricted to what foods we put in our bodies, but our pets now too . . .

But the insistence that there’s no evidence in support of detoxification simply is untrue, she emphasizes. “RDs need to better understand what detoxification actually is from a physiological perspective to be able to evaluate the research and understand the whys and hows of a medical detoxification protocol. Detoxification in medical terms isn’t synonymous with popular cleanses, juice fasts, or water fasts, though a medical nutrition therapy detox may include an elimination diet.”


We are seeing yet another shift in consumer products at the intersection of our Clean Living and Disruptive Innovators investing themes wherein the world’s biggest consumer brands are looking to provide their products to consumers in refillable containers so as to reduce waste. This creates a tailwind behind those providing the containers and the refilling […]
At this point, you have a great base diet full of nourishing whole foods. But now it’s time to get more strategic and add in specific foods that have been shown to improve digestion, heal the gut (since a leaky gut can allow unwanted toxins into the bloodstream), and support the liver or assist your body’s detoxification processes in other ways. These 12 are a great place to start:
An important take-home message is to focus on the types of foods you eat and your overall dietary pattern, instead of on individual nutrients such as fat, dietary cholesterol, or specific vitamins. There are no single nutrients or vitamins that can make you healthy. Instead, there is a short list of key food types that together can dramatically reduce your risk for heart disease.
Carbohydrates are one of your body’s main sources of energy. But most should come from complex, unrefined carbs (vegetables, whole grains, fruit) rather than sugars and refined carbs. Cutting back on white bread, pastries, starches, and sugar can prevent rapid spikes in blood sugar, fluctuations in mood and energy, and a build-up of fat, especially around your waistline. Learn more »
Financial Professionals and experienced Individual Investors that become members receive access to the Thematic Leaders List which includes the top stock in each theme, plus our top overall most thematically-positioned stock. Membership also includes the Tematica Select List which are additional trading ideas of stocks riding our 10 investment themes and regular on-going insights and commentary on the market from a thematic perspective.

Her new eating plan Instead of detoxing to get more produce, Kelly needed to consume more whole fruit and vegetables as part of a balanced diet, Dawn Jackson Blatner, R.D.N., in Chicago, tells SELF. "Dawn taught me ways to work them in, like adding lots of zucchini to pasta sauce," Kelly says. Kelly planned for treats, such as a small cup of ice cream, that she could enjoy without overdoing it. And she cut back on takeout by cooking big meals and saving half for later.
Why she cleansed "Cleansing is spiritual for me," Kai tells SELF. "It's like cleaning out the debris in my consciousness." While studying in Europe during college, she got sick and her face broke out. After a friend suggested the master cleanse (water, maple syrup, cayenne pepper, and lemon juice), Kai's face cleared up. She'll never know if it was the detox or time that healed her. Still, she has done two herbal-supplement detoxes or juice fasts every year since. In between, she eats a raw vegetarian diet. Once she sits down at her desk to work, she becomes so focused that she often forgets to eat. As a result of her skimpy diet, Kai weighs too little. "My goal is to gain because I do want to have a child in a couple of years," she says.

This book is all about clean eating diet. Many of us love food and there are times we don’t actually notice how much we are eating and how unhealthy it is for us which is one of the reason for obesity to increase around the world. A lot of problems develop in a human’s body when we eat way too much and it simply does no good. If you ask me, eating a clean healthy diet is the best option. This book will tell you about the different foods you can eat in order to maintain your weight and live a healthier and a happy life!
According to Marjorie Nolan Cohn, MS, RD, CDN, ACSM-HFS, a spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (the Academy) and the author of The Belly Fat Fix, the human body can eliminate any toxins it comes into contact with just fine and says RDs should warn consumers of the risks involved with such fad diets. “Detox diets are illusive and popular, but they aren't proven to do what they say they'll do—ie, flush toxins out of your system,” she says. “Organs and the immune system can handle detoxification on their own, no matter what you eat. The best detox is an overall healthful eating plan along with plenty of fluid that promotes regular trips to the bathroom.”
Super clean salads highlight all kinds of fresh, wholesome, unprocessed foods, like vegetables, fruits, whole grains, and more. Chickpeas, goat cheese, and walnuts pump up the protein in this arugula salad, making it a hearty meatless main. Dried figs add a big fiber boost—more per serving than any other fruit. Nuts (and seeds too) are a common ingredient in “clean” cooking because they fill you up, provide hard-to-get nutrients like magnesium, zinc, selenium, and vitamin E, and are chock full of good fats.
In truth, our bodies need no extra cleansing—they've got the detoxing thing handled. "We have a liver and kidneys, and they are quite efficient at processing out anything toxic," American Dietetic Association spokeswoman Lona Sandon, R.D., assistant professor of clinical nutrition at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, tells SELF. Colon-cleansing products might actually weaken immunity by killing good bacteria that fend off invading germs in the gut. And in the worst cases, fasting can trigger arrhythmia and even cardiac arrest because of the rapid loss of key electrolytes.
As it turns out, both lines are the same length, but our brain has a tendency to overestimate vertical lines. In other words, taller drinks look bigger to our eyes than round, horizontal mugs do. And because height makes things look bigger than width, you’ll actually drink less from taller glasses. In fact, you will typically drink about 20% less from a tall, slender glass than you would from a short, fat glass. (Hat tip to Darya Pino for originally sharing this image and idea.)
Why she cleansed "I was looking for focus," Kelly, who was traveling for work, studying for the bar, buying a home, and moving, tells SELF. She often ate meals out with friends and reached for Twix bars and fries on the road. Kelly's real estate agent suggested her frazzled client try the cleanse outlined in her favorite book, which called for days of only fruit followed by days of vegetable juices. "I needed energy, so I was willing to go along with the potential craziness."
Dawn Jackson Blatner, RDN, author of "The Superfood Swap," offers this tip: Swap grazing for plated snacks. “I have a tendency to graze mindlessly, and even if it’s on healthy stuff, it adds up,” she says. “Grabbing a spoonful of ‘this’ while standing in the kitchen, scooping a handful of ‘that’ while working at my desk, or eating just a few little bites of ‘something’ while watching TV.” Anyone else familiar with this scenario?

For a 2,000-calorie daily diet, aim for 2½ cups of vegetables and 2 cups of fruit a day. If you consume more calories, aim for more produce; if you consume fewer calories, you can eat less. Include green, orange, red, blue/purple, and yellow vegetables and fruits. In addition to the fiber, the nutrients and phytochemicals in these foods may help protect against certain types of cancer and other diseases. Legumes, rich in fiber, can count as vegetables (though they have more calories than most vegetables). For more fiber, choose whole fruits over juice.

Sheila Dean, DSc, RD, LD, CCN, CDE, an integrative medicine nutritionist and adjunct professor at the USF Health Morsani College of Medicine, agrees: “The words ‘toxin’ and ‘detox’ mean different things to different people. It means different things to the layperson and even among the scientific community, even within the field of dietetics. I don’t believe that there’s consensus and, in my opinion, it’s more about a lack of understanding than a lack of scientific research.”
Sure, you could inhale supper straight out of a bucket, but for a healthy meal, you need to invest at least a few minutes in chopping, rinsing or grilling. The result is worth the effort, Mitchell says. "When you prepare dishes yourself, you can see exactly which ingredients are going into it and make conscious choices about what you truly want to eat," she says.
When it comes to clean eating in America, it's extremely difficult. Everywhere you turn you are exposed to foods with high fat, high carbs, msg, and processed foods. It's truly a challenge but it's not impossible. This book was very practical with its instructions on how to go about trying to eat clean. Very understandable instructions and very easy to follow. Also, I love the different delicious recipes it highlights. I highly recommend this to anyone that is attempting to have a cleaner diet.
How is that possible? Because what makes you sick can make you fat, and what makes you fat can make you sick. It’s all connected. You know when your computer freezes up? What do you do? You reboot. Well, the 10-Day Detox can do the same thing for your metabolism — by following my diet and lifestyle practices, we can reset your metabolism to factory settings. You can lose weight without going hungry, and possibly even clear up a whole list of health symptoms. And all it takes is 10 days.
The latest Dietary Guidelines no longer give a daily cap for dietary cholesterol (previously it was 300 milligrams), because there’s abundant evidence that dietary cholesterol (found only in animal foods) has little if any effect on most people's blood cholesterol. Rather, saturated fats raise LDL (“bad”) cholesterol more than dietary cholesterol does. But don't go overboard with cholesterol-rich foods, since many of them are also high in saturated fats. And if you have cardiovascular disease or diabetes, ask your doctor if you should limit dietary cholesterol.

For people who don’t have the time, energy or interest to plan, shop, and prepare meals, subscription meal-delivery plans may encourage healthier eating and sometimes weight loss. Some plans feature low-sodium or vegetarian meals, which may benefit people with heart disease. Meal-kit plans deliver pre-portioned, mostly fresh ingredients with detailed preparation instructions, which may help people become more comfortable trying new foods and cooking techniques. Plans geared toward weight loss provide microwavable meals and pre-packaged snacks so people don’t have think about portion size or count calories. (Locked) More »
The latest Dietary Guidelines no longer give a daily cap for dietary cholesterol (previously it was 300 milligrams), because there’s abundant evidence that dietary cholesterol (found only in animal foods) has little if any effect on most people's blood cholesterol. Rather, saturated fats raise LDL (“bad”) cholesterol more than dietary cholesterol does. But don't go overboard with cholesterol-rich foods, since many of them are also high in saturated fats. And if you have cardiovascular disease or diabetes, ask your doctor if you should limit dietary cholesterol.
Make half the grains you eat whole grains: An easy way to eat more whole grains is to switch from a refined-grain food to a whole-grain food. For example, eat whole-wheat bread instead of white bread. Read the ingredients list and choose products that list a whole-grain ingredients first. Look for things like: "whole wheat," "brown rice," "bulgur," "buckwheat," "oatmeal," "rolled oats," quinoa," or "wild rice."
Last week’s economic data confirms the global economy continues to slow, and for now, the US remains the best economy on the block. Through the first two months of 2019, the domestic stock market has been on fire even as earnings expectations and dividends continue to be cut. As earnings season fades, time to watch insider selling activity to gauge what lies ahead. Following last week’s earnings report and subsequent drop, we’re doubling down on a Digital Infrastructure Thematic Leader.
In addition, laboratory and animal studies have shown how supplementation may aid the detoxification process, such as with NAC and glutathione.13-15 “The former is the precursor to glutathione, and glutathione is the master detoxifier in the body,” Foroutan says. “Since it’s thought that glutathione doesn’t ‘survive’ digestion, NAC is recommended to increase glutathione stores.” She also says research has shown that milk thistle may support glutathione production and, as such, research has looked into its potential application in ameliorating long-term hepatic and cardiovascular effects of cancer treatment.16-18

Robin Foroutan, MS, RDN, HHC, an integrative medicine nutritionist who’s given presentations on the subject of detoxing, is a big proponent of assisting the detoxification process with diet and supplements, though she may agree with Cohn’s second point. According to Foroutan, while RDs may reject detox on the above principle, she says a proper detoxification regimen can look similar to an overall healthful eating plan, and that research exists supporting nutrition’s role in the detoxification process.
Clean Eating are getting popular these days. Many individual are shifting to this diet. Sierra Goldman did a great job in writing this eBook to help us understand and provide a concrete explanation on what Clean Eating is all about and what health benefits we can get in practising this diet. A step-by-step guide are included in this eBook on how we can get started with this diet. A detailed information about the preparations we will do before w start this diet. The best part about this eBook are the easy to prepare but equally delicious recipes that are included in this eBook. The instructions for each recipes are clear and easy to understand.
Her new eating plan Dietitian Sandon calculated that Johnson was eating only 800 calories a day—so few that she was slowing her metabolism and unable to build muscle. She created a plan to raise Johnson to 1,500 calories a day, enough to get nutrients without causing weight gain. Working with Sandon, Johnson began eating three meals a day, including a breakfast of eggs, fruit, and whole-grain toast, which is high in fiber, to keep foods moving through the body. At each meal, Johnson added a nutritious bonus, such as a yogurt smoothie for calcium. Finally, Sandon urged Johnson to share in the meals she cooked for her family to make eating a positive experience for her and to set a good example for her daughters.
Make half your plate fruits and vegetables: Choose red, orange, and dark-green vegetables like tomatoes, sweet potatoes, and broccoli, along with other vegetables for your meals. Add fruit to meals as part of main or side dishes or as dessert. The more colorful you make your plate, the more likely you are to get the vitamins, minerals, and fiber your body needs to be healthy.
Step 3: Understand the importance of preparing your food in a healthy way. For example, the nutritional value of most vegetables is compromised when they’re cooked (tomato is an exception), so boiling your beans until they have the structural integrity of spaghetti means you’ll have zapped them of nearly all of their nutritional value. Lightly steam, bake or sauté your food, and try to go meatless at least three or four nights a week.
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