"A smoothie with only fruits and fruit juice is essentially dessert!" Rebecca Lewis, in-house R.D. at HelloFresh, tell SELF. Smoothies can definitely be a healthy meal option, provided you're using vegetables in addition to those fruits, and high-protein, high-fiber ingredients like almond milk and chia seeds. Unfortunately a lot of smoothies (especially store-bought varieties) tend to pack in sugar. In fact, a small size at common smoothie stores like Jamba Juice can often contain more than 50 grams of sugar. To be sure you don't end up with a total gut bomb, consider making smoothies yourself. Or double check the ingredient list at your favorite shops and supermarkets.

These foods—notably vegetables, fruits, legumes, and whole grains—should supply about 20 to 35 grams of dietary fiber a day, depending on your calorie needs. (Aim for 14 grams of fiber for every 1,000 calories, as advised by the  Dietary Guidelines for Americans.) Fiber slows the absorption of carbohydrates, so they have less effect on insulin and blood sugar, and it provides other health benefits. Try to fill three-quarters of your plate with produce, legumes, and whole grains—leaving only one-quarter for meat, poultry, or other protein sources.
“Research has shown that people who are into clean living are more about being healthy as a way of preventing disease, rather than looking to overcome one,” Greely says. “I’ve seen people eliminate wheat from their diet only to find their arthritis goes away, and others who’ve suffered hay fever their whole lives suddenly don’t have so much as a sniffle in spring.”

But while our liver is always detoxifying our bloodstream, it’s not necessarily working optimally. The truth is, our bodies aren’t necessarily equipped to deal with the burden they’re now facing. Today, more than ever, we’re bombarded with countless toxins—from pollution to chemicals in skin care products to (perhaps most of all) sugar and preservatives in the foods we eat. These can throw blood sugar totally out of whack, deplete nutrient stores, cause a buildup of dangerous substances in the body like heavy metals, and lead to chronic inflammation—all of which can make us tired and sick. And we’ll continue to feel this way unless we make a shift.

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For example, the phytochemicals that induce phase 2 enzymes can be found in cruciferous vegetables, onions, and garlic.8 Fiber intake supports regular elimination, which is crucial for excreting toxins through the bile and stool, Foroutan says, noting that brown rice fiber may be particularly beneficial in eliminating fat-soluble toxins. Turmeric/curcumin has shown promise in protecting the gallbladder and promoting bile flow,9 and research has shown the potential for pomegranate/ellagic acid in assisting detoxification pathways.10
Our clean living archive has grown so much over the past few years (yay!) that we decided it was time to create a roundup of our favorite clean DIY projects, along with a few tips. We’re passionate about replacing toxic products with clean alternatives, using essential oils daily, and educating our readers about little changes that can make a big difference in your health and overall well-being. Ready to see what made the list?
Super clean salads highlight all kinds of fresh, wholesome, unprocessed foods, like vegetables, fruits, whole grains, and more. Chickpeas, goat cheese, and walnuts pump up the protein in this arugula salad, making it a hearty meatless main. Dried figs add a big fiber boost—more per serving than any other fruit. Nuts (and seeds too) are a common ingredient in “clean” cooking because they fill you up, provide hard-to-get nutrients like magnesium, zinc, selenium, and vitamin E, and are chock full of good fats.
Nutritious, delicious, and comforting, soups are a clean eating mainstay when prepared from fresh ingredients. Vegetable purees in particular are a great way to enjoy fresh-tasting creamy soups without relying on heavy cream and butter for flavor. Here, a hint of toasted sesame oil lends depth to this velvety soup. Use real baby carrots, not the whittled-down packaged ones, which are lacking in flavor. Garnish with sautéed carrot strips.

Calcium. As well as leading to osteoporosis, not getting enough calcium in your diet can also contribute to anxiety, depression, and sleep difficulties. Whatever your age or gender, it’s vital to include calcium-rich foods in your diet, limit those that deplete calcium, and get enough magnesium and vitamins D and K to help calcium do its job. Learn more »
"The front is all advertising," says Michelle K. Berman, R.D., of Fairfax, Virginia. Flip it around for the real story. The more ingredients, the more likely it has visited a few processing plants where something artificial was mixed in, says Lydia Zepeda, Ph.D., professor of consumer science at the University of Wisconsin at Madison. Plus, checking the label is a great way to find out if there are unnecessary ingredients in something seemingly healthy. Because, no, bread does not need added sugar.

In general terms, the detoxification process involves two, potentially three, phases. “Phase 1 enzyme activities include oxidation, reduction, and hydrolysis reactions during which the chemical [or toxin] is ‘activated’ to a more unstable, reactive form,” Foroutan says, adding that the cytochrome P450 is the family of enzymes responsible for phase 1.1,2


Encouraged by the research conducted so far, many integrative medicine nutritionists and other health professionals are including detoxification protocols in their clinical practice.21 Because research still is under way regarding the details of how food can be used as a clinical detoxification tool, no one detoxification protocol currently exists, leaving health practitioners to review the research and interpret how that translates to clinical practice.
The products and/or claims made about specific products found on this website have not been evaluated by the United States Food and Drug Administration and are not intended to diagnose, cure or prevent disease. The information presented on this site is for educational purposes only and is not intended to replace advice from your physician or other health care professional or any information found on any product label or packaging. You should always consult with a qualified health care professional before starting any exercise, diet or supplement regimen.
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