Watch your portion sizes: Check to see what the recommended portion sizes of foods you eat looks like in the bowls, plates, and glasses you use at home. When dining out avoid "supersizing" your meal or buying "combo" meal deals that often include large-size menu items. Choose small-size items instead or ask for a take home bag and wrap up half of your meal to take home before you even start to eat.
Dinner? That's miso soup with some chopped sea vegetables (like the Japanese nori, used to make sushi) snipped over top. Or you might choose a cup of brown rice with a few chopped vegetables mixed in. "Brown rice gives your body plenty of B vitamins, which is a stress reducer. It's very high fiber, will fill you up, will help you sleep, and will flush you out in the morning."
Fresh, Frozen, or Canned Vegetables ― try something new. You may find that you love grilled vegetables or steamed vegetables with an herb you haven’t tried like rosemary. You can sauté (panfry) vegetables in a non-stick pan with a small amount of cooking spray. Or try frozen or canned vegetables for a quick side dish—just microwave and serve. When trying canned vegetables, look for vegetables without added salt, butter, or cream sauces. Commit to going to the produce department and trying a new vegetable each week.
This study secretly took place in the hospital cafeteria and helped thousands of people develop healthy eating habits without changing their willpower or motivation in the slightest way. Thorndike and her team utilized a concept known as “choice architecture.” Choice architecture is just a fancy word for changing the way the food and drinks are displayed, but, as it turns out, it makes a big difference.
One of the best ways to have a healthy diet is to prepare your own food and eat in regularly. Pick a few healthy recipes that you and your family like and build a meal schedule around them. If you have three or four meals planned per week and eat leftovers on the other nights, you will be much farther ahead than if you are eating out or having frozen dinners most nights.
This journey is all about the end-game: a long-term solution to feeling better and eating what makes me feel good –in moderation– forever. This isn’t about extreme restrictions one month of the year followed by slowly getting sick, tired and unhealthy throughout the next 11 months. I’m not saying the elimination diet and cleanse from last year was a bad idea or unproductive. It was an amazing experiment that changed the way I see my life and my health. I learned what my body likes and what it doesn’t; what gives me energy and what taketh away. I HAD to do that to learn what makes sense for my wellness journey. What I need now is not to repeat that journey. Instead I need time to practice maintained moderation and balance. Basically, I need to turn those lessons learned into every day habits.
Common food intolerances include those to soy, gluten, corn, eggs, peanuts, shellfish, and dairy. If you have some of the symptoms above, consider eliminating potential trigger foods for a period of time (it usually takes a few weeks to notice a difference), preferably under the supervision of a doctor or registered dietitian. You’ll also want to eliminate alcohol since your body registers alcohol as a toxin and relies on your liver to process and eliminate it, which can put stress on the organ.
There’s a reason why many people eat as a way to cope with stress. Stress causes certain regions of the brain to release chemicals (specifically, opiates and neuropeptide Y). These chemicals can trigger mechanisms that are similar to the cravings you get from fat and sugar. In other words, when you get stressed, your brain feels the addictive call of fat and sugar and you’re pulled back to junk food.
A better approach is to make a few small changes at a time. Keeping your goals modest can help you achieve more in the long term without feeling deprived or overwhelmed by a major diet overhaul. Think of planning a healthy diet as a number of small, manageable steps—like adding a salad to your diet once a day. As your small changes become habit, you can continue to add more healthy choices.
We are seeing yet another shift in consumer products at the intersection of our Clean Living and Disruptive Innovators investing themes wherein the world’s biggest consumer brands are looking to provide their products to consumers in refillable containers so as to reduce waste. This creates a tailwind behind those providing the containers and the refilling […]
These ruby-hued roots contain a type of antioxidant called betalains, which may help reduce chronic inflammation and repair cells in the liver thanks to their potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Beets also boast high amounts of dietary nitrates, which expand blood vessels and improve blood flow, and thus lower blood pressure. Consider blending your beets with a peeled orange, splash of seltzer, and some ice for a refreshing treat.
Detox: For one small word, it has a whole host of meanings, depending on who’s talking—and possibly what they’re selling. When a client reaches out for nutritional guidance with “detoxing,” he or she may reference a weight-loss cleanse marketed by a celebrity or maybe some simple information on juicing. Or a client may come to an RD complaining of general malaise or illness and wonder whether detoxing can alleviate the symptoms.
I’ve included tips on clean diet preparation and food shopping, ways to meet your healthy eating goals on a day-to-day basis, morning-to-evening recipes, and methodologies for minimalist and mindful living. I’ve written it not from the perspective of someone who hasn’t been in your shoes, but from that of an overweight person who grew up with an unhealthy relationship with food.
I've struggled with my weight and a gluten allergy for most of my life. If this sounds like you, let me help to dispel myths about health and beauty, and support you in cultivating a balanced approach to a healthy lifestyle. My delicious whole foods recipes include meats, gluten free grains and veggies. Watch pounds melt away, as you grow healthier with each nutrient-rich bite!
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