Fats: Can they be healthful? Fats get a bad reputation but are necessary for good health. Different sources of food provide different types and amounts of fat. This article looks at which fats are actually good for you and how to go about replacing unhealthy fats with fats that are good for you, as well as the relationship between fat and weight. Read now
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This super fast weeknight meal comes together in 20 minutes, but is elegant enough to impress a date, or wow a family. The blue cheese and honey give the salad plenty of depth and flavor, and the coffee adds an unbeatable richness to the steak. (Don't worry. It's not enough to keep anyone up.) And it all comes together at just 427 calories per serving! Serve this company-worthy entrée with garlic mashed potatoes and sautéed green beans, and pour a bottle of cabernet sauvignon.

And Ian K. Smith, M.D. agrees. Dr. Ian is a Harvard graduate, founder of the SHRED Lifestyle, and the author several best-selling diet books. He explains that the liver, kidney, lungs, skin, and gastrointestinal system remove toxins that accumulate in the body. But following a detox diet full of natural foods can enhance the body's ability to cleanse. He adds, however, that dieters should make no assumptions about health when choosing a detox diet. "Detoxes have gotten very trendy, and many of them are unhealthy and quite dangerous."


A potato comes from the ground, an egg from a hen. But where did that Pop-tart come from? "Unprocessed, whole foods will give you the most benefits," Berman says. Processing takes out nutrients such as antioxidants and fiber. What's worse is that a lot of processed foods tend to sneak in things that aren't really necessary like extra sodium and sugar. There's nothing wrong with indulging the occasional processed food craving (sometimes a bag of potato chips is too hard to resist!). But if you're trying to shop healthier altogether, be on the lookout for products that have been minimally processed.
There is more than one way to eat healthfully and everyone has their own eating style. Make healthier choices that reflect your preferences, culture, traditions, and budget. Choose fruits, vegetables, grains, dairy, and protein foods to get the most nutrition and meet your personal calorie needs. Aim for a variety of foods and beverages from each food group and limit saturated fat, sodium, and added sugars.
Another way to be a good role model is to serve appropriate portions and not overeat. Talk about your feelings of fullness, especially with younger children. You might say, "This is delicious, but I'm full, so I'm going to stop eating." Similarly, parents who are always dieting or complaining about their bodies may foster these same negative feelings in their kids. Try to keep a positive approach about food.
In general terms, the detoxification process involves two, potentially three, phases. “Phase 1 enzyme activities include oxidation, reduction, and hydrolysis reactions during which the chemical [or toxin] is ‘activated’ to a more unstable, reactive form,” Foroutan says, adding that the cytochrome P450 is the family of enzymes responsible for phase 1.1,2
I recently heard Brooke Alpert on Doctor Radio with Samantha Heller. I’ve always been a big fan of Samantha's nutrition show on Sirius and was equally impressive with Ms. Alpert. I have lost a large amount of weight several times but each time gained it back. Recently I lost 65 pounds and now find myself creeping back up the scale. It’s so frustrating! But listening to Samantha and Brooke talking about weight loss and weight gain it’s as if the proverbial lightbulb went off above my head. Her philosophy is to get rid of diets and just eat real food as a lifestyle change. So I bought Brooke's book and I have to say it has really helped me. She mentioned how over half of her clients are Weight Watcher drop outs (hello, that’s me!). Her approach is to eat real food, not points. She cuts out sugar and many starches from the diet. Actually it’s a lifestyle even though the word diet is used often. I really like how the program is simple, easy to use, and allows for an intentional indulgence every week. This seems like something I could do for the rest of my life. I’ve been following her program for a little over a week and my cravings are gone. I’ve lost 5 lbs and I’m enjoying eating real food that includes healthy fats. Her book is very easy to read and as other reviewer’s have mentioned her style is very conversational. She mentioned on the radio show that she has struggled with losing baby weight with each of her children. So this book was written when she sat down and consolidated her best “nutritionist advice” on how to lose weight in a healthy way for herself. I’m so glad she did because it’s helping me as well.
Protein gives you the energy to get up and go—and keep going—while also supporting mood and cognitive function. Too much protein can be harmful to people with kidney disease, but the latest research suggests that many of us need more high-quality protein, especially as we age. That doesn’t mean you have to eat more animal products—a variety of plant-based sources of protein each day can ensure your body gets all the essential protein it needs. Learn more »
Why she cleansed When her Bikram yoga instructor began touting detox diets, VandeKerkhof was pregnant with her first child, and the idea resonated. "I started to think a lot about toxins," she tells SELF. "Everything you eat transfers to your baby." After weaning her second child, she was bloated, tired, and anxious, and she finally gave the trend a try, spending $300 for a 28-day Arise & Shine colon-cleanse program. "For three weeks, you eat only raw foods, then for one week you have only juice or water," she says.

In truth, our bodies need no extra cleansing—they've got the detoxing thing handled. "We have a liver and kidneys, and they are quite efficient at processing out anything toxic," American Dietetic Association spokeswoman Lona Sandon, R.D., assistant professor of clinical nutrition at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, tells SELF. Colon-cleansing products might actually weaken immunity by killing good bacteria that fend off invading germs in the gut. And in the worst cases, fasting can trigger arrhythmia and even cardiac arrest because of the rapid loss of key electrolytes.
There’s a reason why many people eat as a way to cope with stress. Stress causes certain regions of the brain to release chemicals (specifically, opiates and neuropeptide Y). These chemicals can trigger mechanisms that are similar to the cravings you get from fat and sugar. In other words, when you get stressed, your brain feels the addictive call of fat and sugar and you’re pulled back to junk food.
Make half the grains you eat whole grains: An easy way to eat more whole grains is to switch from a refined-grain food to a whole-grain food. For example, eat whole-wheat bread instead of white bread. Read the ingredients list and choose products that list a whole-grain ingredients first. Look for things like: "whole wheat," "brown rice," "bulgur," "buckwheat," "oatmeal," "rolled oats," quinoa," or "wild rice."
Missing once is fine, but I never want to miss a healthy meal twice. Top performers make mistakes like everyone else, but they get back on track faster than most people. That’s what I try to do with my diet. I don’t worry about having fun and I try to enjoy life, but I also use this simple rule to guide me back toward a healthy diet as quickly as possible.
Dawn Jackson Blatner, RDN, author of "The Superfood Swap," offers this tip: Swap grazing for plated snacks. “I have a tendency to graze mindlessly, and even if it’s on healthy stuff, it adds up,” she says. “Grabbing a spoonful of ‘this’ while standing in the kitchen, scooping a handful of ‘that’ while working at my desk, or eating just a few little bites of ‘something’ while watching TV.” Anyone else familiar with this scenario?
You are what you eat! What you eat can affect every aspect of your health, so make sure you’re eating the good stuff. You can learn more about clean eating from our blog series here, but, in a nutshell, clean eating means eating a diet of whole, organic and unprocessed foods – you know, real food. Avoid things with additives, preservatives and artificial ingredients.
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